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Archive for September 2013

Vaccinations

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends vaccinations beginning at birth through adulthood.  Not only do vaccines prevent an individual from developing a potentially serious disease, they also help reduce the spread of infectious agents.  Vaccines are among healthcare’s most successful and cost-effective tools in preventing disease, disability, and even death in the public.

Urgent Care MD is proud to offer many of the vaccinations you need, including but not limited to the following:

Flu

  • Everyone 6 months of age and older should get their yearly flu vaccine, ideally by October.**

Hepatitis A

  • Hepatitis A is a liver disease caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). Hepatitis A can affect anyone. Vaccines are available for long-term prevention of HAV infection in persons 1 year of age and older. Good personal hygiene and proper sanitation can also help prevent the spread of hepatitis A.**

Hepatitis B

  • Hepatitis B is a serious disease caused by a virus that attacks the liver. The virus, which is called hepatitis B virus (HBV), can cause lifelong infection, cirrhosis (scarring) of the liver, liver cancer, liver failure, and death. Hepatitis B vaccine is available for all age groups to prevent HBV infection.**

Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR)

  • There are two options for protecting children who are 12 months through 12 years old against measles, mumps, rubella (German measles) and varicella (chickenpox):
    • Getting two shots: the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine AND the varicella vaccine**
    • Getting one shot: the measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella (MMRV) vaccine**

Meningitis

  • All 11-12 years olds should be vaccinated with meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MCV4). Now, a booster dose should be given at age 16 years. For adolescents who receive the first dose at age 13 through 15 years, a one-time booster dose should be administered, preferably at age 16 through 18 years, before the peak in increased risk. Adolescents who receive their first dose of MCV4 at or after age 16 years do not need a booster dose.**

Shingles

  • The vaccine for shingles (Zostavax®) is recommended for use in people 60 years old and older to prevent shingles. The older a person is, the more severe the effects of shingles typically are, so all adults 60 years old or older should get the shingles vaccine.**

Tetanus/Diphtheria/Whooping Cough

  • Children should get 5 doses of DTaP, one dose at each of the following ages: 2, 4, 6, and 15-18 months and 4-6 years. DT does not contain pertussis, and is used as a substitute for DTaP for children who cannot tolerate pertussis vaccine.**
  • Td is a tetanus-diphtheria vaccine given to adolescents and adults as a booster shot every 10 years, or after an exposure to tetanus under some circumstances. Tdap is similar to Td but also containing protection against pertussis. Adolescents 11-18 years of age (preferably at age 11-12 years) and adults 19 and older should receive a single dose of Tdap. Women should receive Tdap during each of their pregnancies (preferably in the third trimester between the 27th and 36th week). Tdap should also be given to 7-10 year olds who are not fully immunized against pertussis. Tdap can be given no matter when Td was last received.**

**Source:  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention – http://www.cdc.gov/

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